Can You Put a Roommate On Your Auto Insurance Policy?

Last Updated on June 22, 2020

There are plenty of situations where you may want to list a roommate on your auto insurance policy.

Yes, you can put a roommate on your auto insurance policy. In fact, many insurers require you to list any roommates on your insurance policy.

Roommate rules vary between insurance providers. Some insurers require all driving-age adults in your household to be listed on your policy or named as an excluded driver. Other insurers are more flexible.

Keep reading to discover everything you need to know about putting a roommate on your auto insurance policy.

Can You Put a Roommate On Your Auto Insurance Policy?

Do I Need to Add My Roommate to My Insurance Policy?

Some insurers require anyone driving age or older (i.e. 16 years of age or older) to be listed on your insurance policy. Some insurers are strict. They want to evaluate the risk of anyone in your household who could potentially drive your vehicle – even if that person does not drive your vehicle regularly.

Other insurers are more flexible. They do not require roommates to be listed on your insurance policy unless the roommate is driving your vehicle regularly.

If you do not want to list your roommate on your insurance policy, and you don’t want your roommate to affect your insurance premiums, then you may list your roommate as an excluded driver. Some insurers require you to add roommates as named individuals or excluded drivers on your policy.

If your roommate won’t drive your vehicle, then your insurer may require you to explicitly list your roommate as an excluded driver.

Adding an excluded driver to your policy should not impact insurance premiums. However, it also means your roommate will not be covered if involved in an accident while driving your vehicle. If your roommate is listed as an excluded driver, then you should not let your roommate drive your vehicle.

How to Add a Roommate to Your Car Insurance Policy

Most insurers allow you to easily add any driver who lives at the same address as you.

Just contact your insurer and ask to add your roommate as a named driver.

Reasons to Add a Roommate to your Insurance Policy

Why would you add your roommate to your policy? We’ll talk about the most common reasons to add a roommate to your insurance policy below.

Multi-Vehicle Discounts

Some insurers offer multi-vehicle discounts and other bundling discounts to roommates who share the same address. A multi-car and multi-driver discount could knock 5 to 15% off your premiums – and your roommate’s premiums. Bundling auto insurance together with a roommate could be cheaper than buying separate policies for everyone in your household.

It May Be Required

Some insurers require you to add all driving-age adults in your house to your insurance policy. Some insurers also require you to add roommates to your policy – or specifically list your roommate as an excluded driver, which prevents your roommate from driving your vehicle. Ultimately, talk to your insurer to determine if your roommate needs to be listed on your insurance policy.

More Flexibility with Household Vehicles

When you add your roommate to your insurance policy, it makes it easier for your roommate to drive your vehicle without issue. If you and your roommates get a bundled insurance policy, then you can share household vehicles without worrying about insurance issues.

Reasons to Not Add a Roommate to your Insurance Policy

There are certain situations where you would not want to add your roommate to your insurance policy.

You Don’t Share Vehicles

If you and your roommate do not share vehicles, then there’s no real reason to bundle insurance policies together. It’s easier to keep insurance policies separate. Adding a second driver to your insurance policy – even if it’s your roommate – will almost always raise insurance premiums.

Your Roommate is a High-Risk Driver with a Bad Driving Record

If your roommate is a high-risk driver, then adding your roommate to your insurance policy could raise insurance premiums. Your roommate might have multiple at-fault accidents, a DUI, or other issues, for example. To avoid being penalized for your roommate’s high-risk driving habits, you may want to list your roommate as an excluded driver.

Your Roommate Has Bad Credit

In most states, credit score impacts insurance premiums. If your roommate has a bad credit score, then adding your roommate to your insurance policy could raise premiums – even if your roommate has an otherwise clean driving record.

Your Roommate Drives a High-End Vehicle

If you drive a Honda Civic and your roommate drivers a Maserati, then bundling insurance policies together is not a good idea. Bundling your insurance policies together can significantly raise insurance premiums for you.

Do I Need to Include All Roommates on My Insurance Policy?

Some insurers require you to list roommates on your insurance policy, while others do not.

Generally, if an insurer requires you to list roommates on your policy, then they require you to list any roommates of driving age. Some insurers require anyone over the age of 16 to be listed on your policy, for example, while others require you to only list licensed drivers.

Any teenage children or spouses may also have to be listed on your insurance policy.

Some insurers will ignore this requirement if your roommate can provide proof of having a separate insurance policy.

What Happens If I Don’t List My Roommate?

If you don’t list your roommate, then your insurance company could deny any claims you make. If your insurer requires you to list or exclude any members of your household, and you failed to abide by that requirement, then the insurer may be able to deny your claim.

For this reason, it’s important to check with your insurer to verify you are meeting any roommate-related policy requirements.

Final Word – Do I Have to Put My Roommate on My Car Insurance?

Most insurers only require you to list a roommate on your policy if the roommate plans to drive your vehicle. Some insurers, however, have stricter requirements: they require everyone living at your address to be listed on your policy.

In some cases, it’s advantageous to list your roommate on your insurance policy even if it’s not required.

Contact your insurer to verify any roommate requirements.

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